KnowBe4 named UK’s Security and Consultancy Provider of the year

KnowBe4, the provider of the world’s largest security awareness training (SAT) and simulated phishing platform, announces it has won Network Computing’s Security Training and Consultancy Provider of the Year award.

KnowBe4’s CEO Stu Sjouwerman said, “We are very happy to win this award and are committed to the UK market. We’ve seen explosive growth with organisations recognising the need for training to improve their security culture. Additionally, we are working with UK based organisations such as Twist and Shout to continue to provide relevant and Netflix quality content.” Sjouwerman further noted, “We are also very proud of our UK team for their dedication to our customers.”

According to Verizon’s 2019 data breach investigation report, Phishing was the #1 threat action used in successful breaches linked to social engineering and malware attacks.

Network Utilities partner with KnowBe4 to help our customers keep users on their toes with security top of mind. Effective new-school security awareness training helps reduce risk and strengthen an organisation’s human firewall.

Sources:

DISCOVER THE 14 CORE CAPABILITIES YOU NEED FOR DEFENCE-GRADE SECURITY

The following 14 core technical capabilities were created to help guide and prioritise cybersecurity investments.*

With cyber threats constantly evolving, it’s important to identify the gaps in your security posture and being prepared for cybercriminals to get through your defences in this changing environment is essential. You need to determine where to start and what is most important.

1. Asset Management

Identify assets by leveraging automated tools and discovery solutions (to also discover rogue systems), including:

  • Installed software (including on endpoints, mobile (leverage Mobile Device Management (MDM or EMM) solutions) and servers)
  • Deployed hardware (including endpoints, mobile, cloud and “on- premise” systems)

2. Network Segmentation

Ensure networks are properly segmented, particularly separating the business side from the infrastructure networks.

Focus initially on high value assets and critical systems. Move away from solutions that focus only on “on premise” segmentation and deploy network segmentation solutions, such as Software Defined Perimeter that allows for granular role-based segmentation of on-premise and Cloud-based systems, including legacy systems. Additionally, leverage Network Access Control (NAC) when possible.

3. Network Security

Leverage intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDS/IPS) across enterprise and system enclave boundaries (including ingress, egress points), including using cloud-based appliances whenever possible to monitor cloud traffic.

  • Select solutions that can protect both on-premise and cloud-based traffic and consolidate alerts/logs on a single dashboard
  • Consider leveraging Deep Packet Inspection/Packet Capture (DPI)
  • Consider deploying cloud access security brokers (CASBs) at cloud boundaries
  • Leverage Domain Name Server Security (DNSSEC) to secure your Domain Name Server (DNS)
  • Consider specific distributed denial of service (DDoS) protections to protect servers, applications, and networks
  • Consider solutions that protect communication systems against telephony denial of service (TDoS) and DDoS attacks

4. Identity Management

Manage user access and roles by:

  • Deploying a centralised identity management solution with access control management and identity proofing
  • Leveraging a Single Sign-On solution across the enterprise and its applications
  • Deploying multi-factor authentication across the organisation, particularly for critical systems and privilege access
  • Using identity management best practices to ensure “need to know” and “least privilege”
  • Properly disabling or deleting accounts according to the organisation’s policy requirement

5. Privilege Access

Privilege access management solutions should be deployed to manage and control critical infrastructure systems’ administrative accounts, including:

  • Requiring multi-factor authentication for all administrative accounts, including on servers and endpoints
  • Using solutions, such as Software Defined Perimeter, to enforce multi-factor authentication policies across the enterprise while implementing patching, need to know, and least privilege, among others

6. Patching and Vulnerability Management

  • Conduct proper monitoring and patch installation, including testing prior to patch deployments
  • Prioritise patches based on risk and critical impact
  • Regularly perform automated scanning (daily ideal or weekly), including credentialed, passive, internal, and external scans. Include database configuration and web services configuration scans
  • Install agents on servers and endpoints to facilitate scans whenever possible
  • Scan applications both statically and dynamically
  • Perform source code review when necessary

7. Continuous Monitoring

Continuous monitoring is recommended 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including:

  • Employ alerts and Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) solutions with a customised dashboard to monitor critical systems using proper log management
  • Create/manage a security operation centre (SOC) to continuously monitor critical systems

8. Endpoint Protection

Employ endpoint protection solutions to:

  • Mitigate against viruses, ransomware, and malware using solutions such as Application Segmentation (Micro Virtual Machine isolation), Advanced Endpoint Protection, and Antivirus/Anti-malware
  • Deploy these solutions across all endpoints and servers, including mobile devices
  • Leverage a File Integrity Solution to protect against file tampering/rootkits etc.

9. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)/Key Management

Deploy both symmetric and asymmetric encryption key management solutions, including:

  • Managing public and private keys used for application programming interfaces (APIs), email signing, and encryption using a PKI solution
  • Employing key management solutions to store keys, including Secure Shell (SSH) keys and other encryption keys

10. Log Management

Centralise, correlate and consolidate logs, including:

  • Ingress and egress logs
  • Application logs
  • Endpoint protection logs
  • Firewall logs
  • Security logs such as authentication failure, misuse, unauthorised access, insider threat
  • Server logs
  • Database logs
  • Webserver logs
  • IDS/IPS logs

Ensure proper timestamp by leveraging Time Synchronisation (Network Time Protocol (NTP)) solutions across every system.

11. Phishing Protection

Implement phishing training and plugin solutions, including:

  • Mandating regular phishing training for all employees, including senior executives
  • Deploying email validation system (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance (DMARC), Sender Policy Framework (SPF) and DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM)) to detect and prevent email spoofing
  • Deploying phishing plugin solutions on email servers and endpoints to allow phishing email detection, prevention, and reporting
  • Conducting real-life phishing campaigns to all your employees to measure openings/clicks, and target training to employees opening those emails

12. Configuration Management

Adopt a configuration management solution to properly enforce configuration requirements on servers and endpoints, including:

  • Prioritising solutions that can synchronise logs with SIEM and that support multiple operating systems
  • Leveraging application whitelisting solutions to limit access to necessary applications on endpoints and mobile devices. Whitelisting is recommended instead of blacklisting because new malicious software is too difficult to track

13. Application Security

Application security is the use of software, hardware and procedural methods to prevent vulnerabilities in applications and protect sensitive information from external threats. Applications may include desktop, server, and mobile technology. Software security should be built into applications during their development phase:

  • Fuzz testing (fuzzing) should be leveraged as a quality assurance technique, using a software tool called a fuzzer to discover coding errors and security loopholes in software, operating systems or networks. The technique involves inputting fuzz (massive amounts of random data) to the test subject to make it crash, find vulnerabilities, and identify potential causes
  • Dynamic analysis can be used as the testing and evaluation of a program by executing data in real-time to find errors in a program and flaws in the source code while it is running, rather than by repeatedly examining the code offline. Dynamic code analyser software finds security issues caused by the code’s interaction with other system components like SQL databases, application servers or Web services to debug a program in all the scenarios for which it is designed
  • Static code analysis is also available as one of the security tools the enterprise can use to identify flaws and malicious code in applications before they are bought or deployed. The process provides an understanding of the code structure, and can help to ensure that the code adheres to industry standards
  • Leverage Web Application Firewalls (WAF) solutions to secure your web applications

14. Data Security

Implement solutions to secure data, including:

  • Properly protect data, in particular, personally identifiable information (PII), personal health information (PHI), payment card industry (PCI), and sensitive, classified, and/or financial data, by using Data Loss Prevention solutions:
    • Leveraging solutions to detect and prevent data leaks and massive data exports on servers, databases, and endpoints, when possible
  • Deploying backup solutions across the organisation endpoints, servers, databases, and critical systems
    • Establishing off-site backup, whether in a separate datacentre or on the cloud
  • Mandating encryption for all PII, PHI, PCI, sensitive, and confidential data whenever possible. Examples include:
    • Requiring full disk encryption solutions for mobile devices, laptops, and removable media
    • Using encryption on databases and files whenever required

* 2018 Cybersecurity Guide – originally provided by Bromium featuring Nicolas Chaillan.

Application Isolation and Control – A Modern Defense for New Threats

By Fraser Kyne, EMEA CTO, Bromium

The detection method for preventing malware is fundamentally flawed, yet it is still the de facto standard in cybersecurity. Day after day, organizations scramble to protect against a growing number of threats, but all it takes is one piece of malware to go undetected to wreak havoc on IT systems.

Ironically, this was predicted by Alan Turing more than 80 years ago. His work proved no standard algorithm could ever predict an outcome for every possibility without falling into a logical paradox because of the halting problem. The halting problem proves that an algorithm cannot predict from a general description of a program and an input whether the program will finish running or execute forever.

The same logic applies to malware detection. A standard algorithm cannot be relied on to correctly identify every single threat that comes knocking because the volume of threats is large and varied, with previously unseen threats emerging every day.

A detection-based approach deployed by IT teams is akin to casting out a net, where the net will either be so large that it tangles itself, or it won’t be cast wide enough and will invariably allow some things to be missed. IT teams are trying to solve this problem by adding more layers to their detection solutions, but all this is doing is casting more nets plagued by the same problems.

Detection-based solutions can Over-complicate security landscapes

Hackers are resourceful, utilizing new tactics – such as polymorphic malware and zero-day exploits – to bypass detection-based software and break into critical IT systems. For example, in the Locky ransomware campaign, hackers customized the malware to execute after the fake document was closed, making it much harder to spot and bypassing the majority of detection-based AV solutions.

Instead of focusing on detection, organizations that are serious about security are starting to rely on segmentation. By segmenting networks and applications, businesses are seeing that they can prevent malware from causing harm and keep data and networks safe.

Segmentation offers businesses protection, but it relies on PCs or applications only having access to limited areas on the network. Early iterations failed to achieve a great uptake because adding new PCs to this system can be incredibly expensive and time-consuming during deployment.

Segmenting IP and sensitive data could also still leave users at risk if they don’t isolate the applications that are being used to access this data. Without a solution to these problems, network segmentation has largely failed to get off the ground and detection has persisted as the leading cybersecurity approach.

By focusing on isolation, security Is simplified and end users are protected

Everybody wants to be able to use technology to do more with less. In this instance, it means deploying more effective and reliable cybersecurity solutions. However, detection involves the complex process of “preventing, detecting, and responding”, where multiple layers of security are deployed to identify malware before it hits. However, these layers simply aren’t sufficient to protect against the volume and sophistication of the ransomware and targeted phishing attacks that are prevalent today. As you might expect, it also creates a tremendous expense.

While there are a few choices available that provide isolation, solutions that do this using virtualization are effectively bullet-proof. While no one can promise 100% protection, virtualization that starts on the chip, stops Meltdown, dramatically limits Spectre and works online or offline, can protect what’s targeted the most: endpoints.

Real solutions with a virtual defense

Isolation through virtualization works by allowing applications to open and carry out each task in its own self-contained virtual environment. This means that every tab that is opened in a browser, every Office or PDF document attached to an email, or any file that runs an untrusted executable, will be opened in an entirely isolated virtual environment that’s running on the hardware itself. The result is that any threat caused by an action in this environment won’t have access to anywhere else on the system and can be easily removed by simply destroying the virtual environment.

This allows users the freedom to download files and open documents, safely, knowing that they are no longer the last line of defense – giving users the ability to click with confidence. In fact, end users can let the malware run, because it doesn’t do any damage, and it allows IT teams to get detailed threat analysis. Users can get back to work; recruiters and HR teams can open emailed CVs, marketers can carry out research even if they click on a phishing link, and R&D teams can share downloaded resources without the fear of being stung by malicious files or links.

For organizations using this new approach, there is less worry. Virtualization-based security is being adopted by the giants: HP and Microsoft now use virtualization-based security to protect users. This is just the tip of the iceberg and marks the beginning of a virtualization revolution in security, where users no longer fear opening links and attachments and organizations can let their teams focus on innovation without worrying about making a security mistake.

About the Author

By Fraser Kyne, EMEA CTO, Bromium Fraser’s role has encompassed a wide range of both engineering and customer-facing activity. Prior to joining Bromium Fraser was a Technical Specialist and Business Development Manager at Citrix Systems. He has been a speaker at various industry events on topics such as virtualization, security, desktop transformation, and cloud computing.

Source: Cyber Defense Magazine
http://www.cyberdefensemagazine.com/application-isolation-and-control-a-modern-defense-for-new-threats/

Read more from Fraser:

Busting The Top Four Myths About Hacking

By Torben Andersen, CCO, SMS PASSCODE

Are you protecting your data with just a password? If your answer is no, and you have strong multi-factor authentication in place, then good job: you are free to go out and enjoy the sunshine. If you answered yes, then stick around for a few more minutes to learn why a password alone is not enough to secure access to your corporate networks and applications.

Still here? Okay then, allow me to start by busting some of the typical myths about hacking today.

1# Myth – Hackers only target the big brands
blog-image-1

When big brands like Target, eBay, Adobe, and Sony are hacked, it’s big news for business and mainstream publications. Don’t be fooled: big companies aren’t the only ones being targeted. In fact, research shows that 31 percent of all hacking attacks were aimed at businesses with fewer than 250 employees.

2# Myth – You have nothing valuable for hackers to steal

blog image 2.jpgFair enough. Not everyone is fortunate enough to be storing breakthrough research with the potential to revolutionize your industrythe world if only you can keep it secret long enough to secure a patent. But what about your business email? Email often contains highly sensitive data, such as competitive bids, investment plans or pipeline information. Imagine the damage if these details were to fall into the wrong hands.

There’s even more low-hanging fruit to steal if hackers breach your network. Customer records, credit card information and even employee user credentials are worth as much as $50 USD per record when sold on the Internet. An entire shadow economy has emerged online with brokers selling stolen user records; according to the FBI, cybercrime has become even more profitable than drug-related crimes. This makes everyone a target.

3# Myth – Your anti-virus and network vulnerability tests will keep you safe

blog-image-3Patch management, updated anti-virus applications and frequent network vulnerability tests are all good weapons in a defense against hackers. However if you are not securely authenticating your users when they access your corporate networks or applications, then you’re leaving the front door open for the hackers. Research shows that weak or stolen passwords are exploited in 76 percent of all network breaches. So, yes, this really is the hackers’ preferred way in.

4# Myth – Hackers are teenagers lurking in a basement somewhere

For most of us, the word “hacker” prompts images of pale teenage boys with long hair, black t-shirts and a serious grudge against Microsoft. While many hackers probably still fit this description, the reality is that the hacker has evolved. Today’s hacker is highly-educated, well-connected, and well-equipped, enjoying a high-income profession as a professional cybercriminal. The hackers have some powerful tools at their disposal, and many poorly-protected victims has made hacking easier than ever before, resulting in cybercrime becoming the fastest growing crime type in the world.

Hackers’ motive is most often financial gain, but “hacktivism” is also becoming a growing threat to nations and organizations that don’t sympathize with the hacker’s cause.

Knowing what’s myth and what’s fact is essential to avoid running unnecessary risks to your business. SMS Passcode have created an infographic and short video that capture the key facts from the latest research about the threat companies face from hacks.

Additional Resources:

The Harsh Reality of Cyber Protection

Harsh Reality – We Are More At Risk Than Ever

Palo_Alto_BlogHere’s a very useful webinar from our partners at Palo Alto Networks on the Harsh Realities of Cyber Protection.

If you have concerns about your risk to attack join our Ultimate Test Drive Event 15th April, London. Register here.

The endpoint is where the security war is now taking place; attackers are getting more advanced, deploying unknown exploits and unique malware that current day security is simply not equipped to prevent or even detect. Palo Alto Networks walk you through the shortcomings of existing endpoint security, and why it’s leaving your enterprise vulnerable to sophisticated and zero-day attacks, waiting for detection and remediation to step in, which is too little too late.

View the webinar on the Palo Alto website here.