Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 2

IT teams are on a constant treadmill of change, which is driven by five major trends shaping the delivery of Secure Access.

1. The consumerisation of IT is revolutionising.

It has completely changed the nature of today’s workplace and contributing to digital business transformation. Enterprises are confronted with proliferation of smart devices and online apps. Millennials, who will represent almost fifty percent of the workforce by 2020, are tech savvy and accustomed to a rich, on-the-go personal digital experience – and they expect a similar digital experience at work using their own mobile devices. Enterprises are challenged to support workforce dynamics and deliver this consumer-like user experience for their employees without compromising key compliance and security requirements.

2. Networks are increasingly under attack.

With new cyberthreats and data leakage in the headlines, security breaches have reached crisis proportions. Reducing the Mean-Time-to-Detect (MTTD) and Mean-Time-To-Respond (MTTR) to vulnerabilities and incidents has never been more important for organisations. Visibility, real-time prevention and automated response are critical for IT to combat threats that are the result of insider activity, privilege misuse, non-compliant and unsanctioned devices and device loss.

3. Cloud computing and hybrid IT environments are the norm.

The traditional data centre environment has morphed into a blended enterprise, cloud and cloud service environment. In this new world, IT resources are typically deployed in an enterprise’s own private cloud or leverage third-party public clouds, including Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offerings. Even though multi-cloud has become the new normal, cloud security still may not be as trusted as traditional data centre protection. After all, the primary product offering of cloud providers such as Google and Amazon Web Services (AWS) is space, processing power and bandwidth – not security. To ensure appropriate and protected connectivity to applications and information, businesses need Secure Access solutions that can extend proven data centre security to the cloud.

4. Use of multiple security silos for enterprise access.

Hybrid IT environments contribute heavily to this trend as IT extends existing data centre security policies to cover IaaS and SaaS situations. Unfortunately, the use of point solutions to address access security within different computing environments frequently leaves gaps, limits visibility and yields inconsistent policies. This also often results in a complex and frustrating user experience. In a 2017 report by ESG, 66% of cybersecurity and IT professionals agreed or strongly agreed that security analytics and operations effectiveness is limited because it is based upon multiple independent point tools.

5. The Internet of Things (IoT) is exploding.

Printers, smart TVs, personal WiFi, security cameras, sensors, and other peripheral devices are becoming commonplace. These devices are all connected via laptops, desktops, smartphones, or directly on enterprise networks and often further connected through IP networks to other corporate and third-party resources. The security of these systems, from changing default passwords to installing patches, is often an afterthought at best – frequently leaving IoT devices vulnerable to attack and misuse. Typically, organisations are unaware of these devices, and the myriad of ways they are connecting to their internal systems and data. With the rise of Industry 4.0, which uses IoT and cloud to boost manufacturing output, cybersecurity concerns are now bleeding over from IT into the operational technology (OT) domain. Hackers now view IoT as a new opportunity for targeted attacks, taking advantage of security weaknesses and employee ignorance alike. To gain control of the risks posed by IoT, organisations need to redesign their security architecture for IT and OT end-to-end visibility, contextual awareness, and real-time action.

Secure Access ensures that in a Zero Trust world only authenticated users with compliant devices can connect to authorised applications and information at any time, from any location, over any network.

Original source: Zero Trust Secure Access Checklist via https://www.pulsesecure.net

Read Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 1 here

Read Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 3 here

Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 1

You can’t secure what you can’t see, so visibility is key.

Enabling the modern, mobile workforce is hard work! Users are demanding and require access to applications regardless of their location. Not to mention the increased sophisticated malware and hackers that keep beating down the door.

In an ideal world you want to know your mobile workforce is entirely visible on your network, however, in this ever-changing world we live in making assumptions about user identity is a security risk in itself.

Mitigate your security risk with a Zero Trust Secure Access model.

Secure Access ensures that in a Zero Trust world only authenticated users with compliant devices can connect to authorised applications and information at any time, from any location, over any network. However, with new cyber threats and security breaches in the headlines every day companies must ensure a balance between productivity and security. With the rise of digital transformation Secure Access is critical to your workforce and will enable you to empower your employees, customers and partners to work, communicate and collaborate seamlessly.

Traditionally this has been a difficult goal. IT administrators enforce rules to meet the business requirements and adhere to compliance.

This traditional approach can result in poor user experience (UX), causing users to seek alternatives in order to get their jobs done. The growth of shadow IT proves just that, with no trouble at all users are leveraging unsecured personal devices and unsanctioned cloud services to address the very tasks they need to do to get the job done.

Secure Access, in contrast, is designed with a seamless, simple user experience in mind that also provides Zero Trust protection.

It’s a model based on enablement rather than restriction. The objective is to deliver simple and frictionless access to enterprise information, applications and services without compromising security – all while making it easy and flexible for IT to implement, manage and adapt security policies that align with an ever-changing environment.

Zero Trust assumes that nothing inside or outside of the enterprise perimeter should be trusted and the network must verify anyone and anything trying to connect before granting access. Connectivity is only granted after identity is authenticated, the security posture of the connected device is verified, and the user or thing is authorised to access the desired application, service or information*.

* Source: Zero Trust Secure Access Checklist via https://www.pulsesecure.net

Read Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 2 here

Read Secure Access for Today and Tomorrow: Part 3 here